Afghan Boy Holding a beautiful kite

Welcome to AfghaniKites.com! 


We specialize in handmade traditional light wind Afghan kites made from light paper and bamboo sticks. These kites do not require a lot of wind ( ideal wind range 3-7 mph ) and can be flown from just a few to hundreds of yards high. 


They are very popular in countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan and India ( As displayed in our Gallery ). Kids as well as adults are very passionate about these kites and fly them on regular basis. In Afghanistan, it is more common during winter due to kids being off school and the windy days. Afghan kites are flown from roof tops, streets, side walks, just about anywhere.


At Afghanikites.com, we like to give everyone an opportunity to try Afghan Kites for themselves. They are not very hard to fly and with some tips, clips offered on our site and some practice you will be on your way to the sky.


Our Kites are very unique and come in different Designs & Colors. The kite you see and purchase will be the exact kite you will receive! 

In addition, Each Kite


- Has been Tested & Balanced

- Has it's String Tightened Adjusted professionally by us


This is to ensure by time you get your kite, it will be ready to Fly!


Afghan Kite making a beautiful landing after a long distance flight!

Wing Range: About 5mph

Kite Featured: Medieval Shield

Kite Dimension: ( 35"w x 30"1/2t )

An Intro to Afghan Kites



Kite Fighting:


Besides being flown for leisure, Afghan Kites are also used for kite fighting ( also known as Gudiparan Jangi ) . Sometimes these kites are referred to as Afghan Fighter Kites. This is where two kites battle each other to the end. The interesting part is that the kites themselves don't really touch/hit one another, instead the string used to fly them does. The string used for kite fighting is coated with fine glass ( referred to as Sheesha ). As one kite's string cross the path of the other kite's string, they start to tangle with each other. Once this happens the battle starts, the kite fighter keeps feeding more and more string ( this is called Tar Dahdan ) until eventually one kite cuts the other and by doing so win the battle. In other instance the kite fighters pulls real fast on to the string and cut their opponent that way. There are many tricks and techniques to kite fighting which can take years to master. Some battles only last a second, literally as one kite's string come in contact with the opponent's string it would cut it on spot ( this is referred to as wining by the way of Dakha, like a KO! ), and some battles can drag for minutes. Every now and then a champ emerges, one who cuts 5, 10 or 20 kites in a row like an undefeated fighter. In Afghanistan they referred to these Champ as "Sharti". Every neighborhood have one or two Sharties and sometimes the Sharties kite fight each other in order to unify the title sort of speak. These Champs don't have an official title. People just know they are the Champ. 


* Please check out the short movie clip at the bottom of this page where it highlights Afghan Kite Fighting beautifully.

Kite Running:


Simply watching kites fly and fight each other would be as fun as flying them sometimes. Some days the sky gets busier than others in Afghanistan. One person would fly a kite, then their neighbor, then the neighbor's cousin and so on. Before you know it, the sky will be filled with beautiful kites of all colors, designs and sizes. Some fly close and low, some so far to the point where you can barely see it ( just a little dot in the sky ). While all this is happening, you see loose kites ( also known as Azatt, meaning free ) just flying in the sky, these kites are usually one which lost a kite fight and are just floating in air until some lucky person catches it and claim is  as their own. Young Afghan boys will run after these kites like there is no tomorrow. If a loose kites is flying over a residential neighborhood, they will climb trees, walls, jump from one roof to another, land into someone back yard if needed, almost like a cat chasing its prey. If the loose kite is over a flat surface, then usually one or two kids will always have a long wooden stick also known as a Khada. They will use this stick to enhance their reach to the loose kite and get their hands on it faster then anyone else. 





Afghan kites do not require a lot of wind. They are best for light winds, they just need about 3 - 7 mph light steady breeze. At Afghanikites.com, we offer one on one kite flying instruction to our local customers as well as provide flying tips on our site for the non local customers at our Flying Tips Tab



A few years ago a book followed by movie called "The Kite Runner" was released where it displays this fun activity very well, in fact they have done such a great job at displaying these kites that we have decided to included a clip from the movie below to give you an idea on how these kites are flown as well as how they are used in kite fighting. 


Afghan Kites Featured in the Movie Kite Runner


Enjoy!

Fascinating Kite flying/fighting scene from the movie Kite Runner!


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Contact Us: AfghaniKites@gmail.com